(Impossible) Crime in Translation: The Seventh Guest by Gaston Boca (1935)

Then a dispute arose between d’Arlon, his wife, and Émile. There were six of us, including Émile, who were supposed to share the table. But seven settings had been laid.Émile claimed he had taken the number of place settings prepared by his mistress. She claimed to have laid out the correct number. According to John … Continue reading (Impossible) Crime in Translation: The Seventh Guest by Gaston Boca (1935)

In Translation: Three Novels

This year, I read only three books in translation. THE DOGS AND THE WOLVES (LES CHIENS ET LES LOUPS) by IRENE NEMIROVSKY (1940) Ada Sinner, from the wrong side of the fence, has a glimpse of her wealthy cousin, Harry and falls in love with him. This is no childhood infatuation because even in her … Continue reading In Translation: Three Novels

Women in Translation: Shadow Sister by Simone Van Der Vlugt

Usually, I don't enjoy modern mysteries because I feel the world intrudes too much. Racism, sexism, pedophilia, dysfunctional families become the foci of the novel rather than the murder. However, while reading Simone Van Der Vlugt's Shadow Sister, I was surprised when I became more interested in the problems that a teacher of a school … Continue reading Women in Translation: Shadow Sister by Simone Van Der Vlugt

Tuesday Night Bloggers: The Sixth Simenon Omnibus

Georges Simenon, was a prolific Belgian author, most famous for his fictional commissaire of Paris' Brigade Criminelle, Jules Maigret. However, he also wrote many books which did not feature Maigret.The Sixth Simenon Omnibus contains three novels which discuss the role that sex has in people's lives - whether as a way of exhibiting their power … Continue reading Tuesday Night Bloggers: The Sixth Simenon Omnibus

Forgotten Book: Satyanveshi Vyomkesh by Sharadindu Bandyopadhyay

Despite my love for mysteries, I haven't read much of our Indian detectives. But this month, I was determined to read the exploits of Byomkesh Bakshi, a detective created by Bengali writer Sharadindu Bandyopadhyay, in 1932 and to whom I was first introduced to by an eponymous TV serial that was telecast in 1993.Though, I … Continue reading Forgotten Book: Satyanveshi Vyomkesh by Sharadindu Bandyopadhyay

First Read of 2015: The Individual and Society

I have started 2015 with an anthology The Individual and Society. Divided into five parts: Caste/ Class; Gender; Race; Violence and War; and Living in a Globalized World, this has some wonderful pieces on all these important issues. While many of the writers were familiar to me, I have also discovered new voices like Maya … Continue reading First Read of 2015: The Individual and Society