Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Adventures of Feluda by Satyajit Ray (1988)

@ Hindustan Times Cinematic legend, Satyajit Ray (1921-1992) is renowned all over the world for his filmmaking skills, especially for his Apu trilogy. Not many people know that he was also a very keen reader of detective stories and that his own creation, Prodosh Chandra Mitter [more famously known by the sobriquet Feluda] is one … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Adventures of Feluda by Satyajit Ray (1988)

#GermanLitMonth: Three Crime Novels

The German Literature month has given me a wonderful opportunity to read three authors who had long been on my wishlist. Splinter by Sebastian Fitzek (2009) 'Back to the default position?' said Marc. 'A total reset?' Marc Lucas is a psychiatrist who has enough problems of his own. A few months prior to the beginning … Continue reading #GermanLitMonth: Three Crime Novels

Friday’s Forgotten Book: Miss Jessica’s Stick by Aylmer Hunter (1942)

" There's good stuff in all the Mildmays. And bad stuff too. Either win the V.C. or commit murder." @ebay Jane Carstairs has been through a lot. At the age of 21 while she was all rich and comfortable, her father lost everything on certain dubious speculations. In what was termed a fit of insanity … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: Miss Jessica’s Stick by Aylmer Hunter (1942)

#Germanlitmonth: Babylon Berlin by Volker Kutscher (2007)

He understood that there were different versions of the truth. Every police officer knew that, with each trial it was experienced afresh. The war is fresh in people's memory and mourning; the monarchy has been reduced to porn pin-ups; Hitler is "that strange bird with a Charlie Chaplin moustache"; Himmler and his dreaded SS are … Continue reading #Germanlitmonth: Babylon Berlin by Volker Kutscher (2007)

#1976 Club: Another Death in Venice by Reginald Hill

Since the time I finished my first Reginald Hill at the beginning of the year, I had been planning to read another book of his but somehow never got round to it. The 1976 book club, hosted by Simon @ Stuck in a Book and Karen @ Kaggsy's Bookish Ramblings, has now given me the … Continue reading #1976 Club: Another Death in Venice by Reginald Hill

Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Majestic Mystery by Denis Mackail (1924)

"Then how do you know he was shot at all?"There was an irritating air of the amateur detective about this question which roused Peter at once. Friends Peter Langley and James Vincent are journalist, very junior in the hiearchy. One weekend, after submitting their articles to their newspapers, they decide to take a trip to … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Majestic Mystery by Denis Mackail (1924)

Malicious: Death at the Wedding by Anne Hocking (1946)

Major William Austen is not happy with his current position in the army. As the war nears its end, he wants to go back to his earlier position in the Scotland Yard. He is currently a top-shot in the espionage department but wants to become a Chief Inspector once again. His friend Andrea tells him … Continue reading Malicious: Death at the Wedding by Anne Hocking (1946)

Revenge and Regret: Vendetta by Harry Carmichael (1963)

"All of us nurse our own private sorrow. Where I come from, tragedy made a common bond between strangers. Since then we have taught ourselves to forget. It's the only way to make life tolerable...' So you discover a new-to-you-author and fall in love with the book and want to read more of him. Only … Continue reading Revenge and Regret: Vendetta by Harry Carmichael (1963)

Murder in MESS: The Crimson Cat by Francis Grierson (1944)

Like Cecil Freeman Gregg whom I read recently, Francis Grierson is another prolific writer who is virtually unknown today. Here is an informative post on him: https://tellersofweirdtales.blogspot.com/2013/11/francis-d-grierson-1888-1972.html Grierson's series character, Superintendent George Muir is at the Ministry of Estimates and Social Service (MESS) when the novel opens. He is there to investigate the leaks that … Continue reading Murder in MESS: The Crimson Cat by Francis Grierson (1944)

Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Old Manor by Cecil Freeman Gregg (1945)

MasterMoreton opened his eyes at this admission and stared up into the inspector's face with renewed interest, suddenly remembering the conversation in the train and his disparagement of the police in general. Bit of a floater really but... Young Augustine Marryon Moreton is in low spirits. Not because of his name or short height or … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Old Manor by Cecil Freeman Gregg (1945)