Friday’s Forgotten Book: Judy of Bunter’s Buildings by E. Phillips Oppenheim (1936)

Of all the sounds in this gathering darkness that was the one which she had dreaded most. Judy is a dancer at a bar called the Green Man which is frequented by sailors. When the novel opens, Judy is at her room in Bunter's Buildings when she hears another tenant making his way to the … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: Judy of Bunter’s Buildings by E. Phillips Oppenheim (1936)

Five Mysteries of 1940

AUNT BEARDIE by JOSEPH SHEARING Joseph Shearing is one of the pseudonyms of prolific author, Margaret Gabrielle Vere Long, more popularly known by another pseudonym of hers, Marjorie Bowen. Last year, I read her gothic mystery, The Crime of Laura Sarelle, and was blown away. Determined to read more of her, I selected this novel … Continue reading Five Mysteries of 1940

He ain’t no Dickson Carr: E.P. Oppenheim’s The Golden Beast (1926)

Lord Israel Honerton sits watching his family at the dinner table, his thoughts tinged with melancholy when a servant enters and tells Israel's eldest son,Cecil, that the gamekeeper John Heggs wants to talk to him regarding the hunting expedition the next day. Cecil, for some reason apprehensive, leaves the table and meets the Keeper who … Continue reading He ain’t no Dickson Carr: E.P. Oppenheim’s The Golden Beast (1926)

The Strange Boarders of Palace Crescent by E.P. Oppenheim (1934)

I am very fond of mysteries set in hotels. A group of disparate people, strangers to each other, staying under the same roof and interacting with each other makes for some lively reading as most of them they are pretending to be what they are not. The travelling salesman turns out to be a spy; … Continue reading The Strange Boarders of Palace Crescent by E.P. Oppenheim (1934)

As the War-Clouds Gather: E.P. Oppenheim’s The Double Traitor

The Right Honourable John William Hebblethwaite took the hat from his footman, stepped into his car, and was driven rapidly away. He leaned back among the cushions, more thoughtful than usual. There was a yellow moon in the sky, pale as yet. The streets were a tangled vortex of motorcars and taxies, all filled with … Continue reading As the War-Clouds Gather: E.P. Oppenheim’s The Double Traitor