Earthshaker: The Poseidon Adventure by Paul Gallico (1969)

There are minor spoilers in this post so please consider yourself warned. Then why did hope persist? Why this upward striving, this eternal climbing by himself and these ill-assorted people, castaways in a floating tomb, the odds on whose chances for rescue were astronomical? A group of people, herded together because of some natural calamity … Continue reading Earthshaker: The Poseidon Adventure by Paul Gallico (1969)

Revenge and Regret: Vendetta by Harry Carmichael (1963)

"All of us nurse our own private sorrow. Where I come from, tragedy made a common bond between strangers. Since then we have taught ourselves to forget. It's the only way to make life tolerable...' So you discover a new-to-you-author and fall in love with the book and want to read more of him. Only … Continue reading Revenge and Regret: Vendetta by Harry Carmichael (1963)

Three Non-Fictional Reads

My Life My Rules: Stories of 18 Unconventional Careers by Sonia Golani My first read of the year 2020, the book charts the career of 18 individuals who shrugged off conventional wisdom by leaving highly-paid jobs and taking on something their heart desired: becoming a rock star, a food critic, a cricket commentator, a DJ, … Continue reading Three Non-Fictional Reads

Dare to Dream: In the Red by Joan Fleming (1961)

My last three reads of Joan Fleming were more or less a disaster and I was in no mood to read another book by her. However, I needed to read just one more book of hers, to partially complete Rick Mills' Six-Shooter Mystery Challenge (if you want to join for the 2021 edition of this … Continue reading Dare to Dream: In the Red by Joan Fleming (1961)

Friday’s Forgotten Book: Passenger to Nowhere by Anthony Gilbert (1965)

"...there are old women living in big houses in all the country districts in France. Sometimes one remembers - they could die and who would know? They have no friends because they desire none - they have met life alone, they meet death alone." Sarah Hollis, nursing a broken heart after her fiancé breaks off … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: Passenger to Nowhere by Anthony Gilbert (1965)

Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Girl in Cabin B54 by Lucille Fletcher (1968)

Dr. Vernon Grove had once dreamt of being a doctor who makes a difference in the lives of people, now divorced from his wife and estranged from his son, he is a ship-doctor who uses the time on sea to flirt with beautiful female passengers and have a fling with them. Usually this provides fun … Continue reading Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Girl in Cabin B54 by Lucille Fletcher (1968)

Hands-Off: Girl on the Run by Hillary Waugh (1965)

A small town community is shocked when an elderly woman is killed by her niece who flees taking the little money that was there in the house after stabbing her aunt. The niece had always been considered strange by the people in the town but nobody thought that she would stoop to murdering her aunt … Continue reading Hands-Off: Girl on the Run by Hillary Waugh (1965)

Three Novels by Jean Potts

American author, Jean Potts (1910-1999), won an Edgar award for her first novel, Go, Lovely Rose (1954), but still fell into obscurity. Then sometime in 2018, John F. Norris reviewed a few of her books at his blog, Pretty Sinister Books. John’s admiration for the books so impressed a publishing house that they brought back … Continue reading Three Novels by Jean Potts

Short Notes: Death of a Sardine by Joan Fleming (1963)

Having taken his final exams at Oxford, Tom Warrington leaves for Portugal where his father, Brigadier Warrington, has set-up an opulent villa. Accompanying him is Oxford-mate, Meeth, a rather shabby and down-at-heels young man who arouses Tom's pity. Tom and his father share an uncomfortable relationship which is further accentuated when Tom reaches Portugal and … Continue reading Short Notes: Death of a Sardine by Joan Fleming (1963)

Two books by Joan Fleming: Miss Bones (1959) & The Chill and the Kill (1964)

I read Joan Fleming for the first time last year because the cover of her book, The Chill and the Kill, had me intrigued when I first read about the book at John Norris' iconic Pretty Sinister Books. The cover with its serpentine female figure reminded me of the Indian legend of the shape-shifting Nagins, … Continue reading Two books by Joan Fleming: Miss Bones (1959) & The Chill and the Kill (1964)